About Geordie

I'm the chief technology officer of D-Wave and 2010 NAGA Brazilian jiu-jitsu light heavyweight world champion.

Quantum annealing correction for random Ising problems

A new paper from users of the D-Wave Two at USC. Here’s the abstract:

We demonstrate that the performance of a quantum annealer on hard random Ising optimization problems can be substantially improved using quantum annealing correction (QAC). Our error correction strategy is tailored to the D-Wave Two device. We find that QAC provides a statistically significant enhancement in the performance of the device over a classical repetition code, improving as a function of problem size as well as hardness. Moreover, QAC provides a mechanism for overcoming the precision limit of the device, in addition to correcting calibration errors. Performance is robust even to missing qubits. We present evidence for a constructive role played by quantum effects in our experiments by contrasting the experimental results with the predictions of a classical model of the device. Our work demonstrates the importance of error correction in appropriately determining the performance of quantum annealers.

Two interesting papers from the Ames crew

Hi everyone! Sorry for being silent for a while. Working. :-)

Two interesting papers appeared on the arxiv this week, both from people at Ames working on their D-Wave Two.

First: A Quantum Annealing Approach for Fault Detection and Diagnosis of Graph-Based Systems

Second: Quantum Optimization of Fully-Connected Spin Glasses

Enjoy!

Entanglement in a Quantum Annealing Processor

Figure 5A new paper published today in Phys Rev X. It demonstrates eight qubit entanglement in a D-Wave processor, which I believe is a world record for solid state qubits. This is an exceptional paper with an important result. The picture to the left measures a quantity that, if negative, verifies entanglement. The quantity s is the time — the quantum annealing procedure goes from the left to the right, with entanglement maximized near the area where the energy gap is smallest.

Here is the abstract:

Entanglement lies at the core of quantum algorithms designed to solve problems that are intractable by classical approaches. One such algorithm, quantum annealing (QA), provides a promising path to a practical quantum processor. We have built a series of architecturally scalable QA processors consisting of networks of manufactured interacting spins (qubits). Here, we use qubit tunneling spectroscopy to measure the energy eigenspectrum of two- and eight-qubit systems within one such processor, demonstrating quantum coherence in these systems. We present experimental evidence that, during a critical portion of QA, the qubits become entangled and entanglement persists even as these systems reach equilibrium with a thermal environment. Our results provide an encouraging sign that QA is a viable technology for large scale quantum computing.

Distinguishing Classical and Quantum Models for the D-Wave Device

Here’s a neat paper from UCL and USC researchers ruling out several classical models for the D-Wave Two, including the SSSV model (“…the SSSV model can be rejected as a classical model for the D-Wave device”), and giving indirect evidence for up to 40 qubit entanglement in a real computer processor.

Olympic Gold at the Creative Destruction Lab

The president of the University of Toronto, Dr. Meric Gertler, attended the last G7 meeting, which coincidentally was on the first day of the 2014 Winter Olympics. He presented us with medals. This is as close to Olympic gold as I’m going to get, so the gesture was appreciated.

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I knew I should have worn my suit.

Here’s a ‘group shot’ with my G7 friends sporting their new hardware.

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