It’s like the quantum computer is playing 20 questions…

I’ve been thinking about the BlackBox compiler recently and came up with a very interesting analogy to the way it works. There are actually lots of different ways to think about how BlackBox works, and we’ll post more of them over time, but here is a very high level and fun one.

The main way that you use BlackBox is to supply it with a classical function which computes the “goodness” of a given bitstring by returning a real number (the lower this number, the better the bitstring was).

Whatever your optimization problem is, you need to write a function that encodes your problem into a series of bits (x1, x2, x3…. xN) to be discovered, and which also computes how “good” a given bitstring (e.g. 0,1,1…0) is. When you pass such a function to Blackbox, the quantum compiler then repeatedly comes up with ideas for bitstrings, and using the information that your function supplies about how good its “guesses” are, it quickly converges on the best bitstring possible.

So using this approach the quantum processor behaves as a co-processor to a classical computing resource. The classical computing resources handles one part of the problem (computing the goodness of a given bitstring), and the quantum computer handles the other (suggesting bitstrings). I realized that this is described very nicely by the two computers playing 20 questions with one another.

Quantum computer 20 questions

The quantum computer suggests creative solutions to a problem, and then the classical computer is used to give feedback on how good the suggested solution is. Using this feedback, BlackBox will intelligently suggest a new solution. So in the example above, Blackbox knows NOT to make the next question “Is it a carrot?”

There is actually a deep philosophical point here. One of the pieces that is missing in the puzzle of artificial intelligence is how to make algorithms and programs more creative. I have always been an advocate of using quantum computing to power AI, but we now start to see concrete ways in which it could really start to address some of the elusive problems that crop up when trying to build intelligent machines.

At D-Wave, we have been starting some initial explorations in the areas of machine creativity and machine dreams, but it is early days and the pieces are only just starting to fall into place.

I was wondering if you could use the QC to actually play 20 questions for real. This is quite a fun application idea. If anyone has any suggestions for how to craft 20 questions into an objective function, let me know. My first two thoughts were to do something with Wordnet and NLTK. You could try either a pattern matching or a machine learning version of ‘mining’ wordnet for the right answer. This project would be a little Watson-esque in flavour.

New tutorials on devPortal: WMIS and MCS

There are two new tutorials on the website, complete with code snippets! Click on the images to go to the tutorial pages on the developer portal:

Quantum computer tutorial quantum programming

This tutorial (above) describes how to solve Weighted Maximum Independent Set (WMIS) problems using the hardware. Finding the Maximum Independent Set of a bunch of connected variables can be very useful. At a high level, the MIS it gives us information about the largest number of ‘things’ that can be achieved from a set when lots of those ‘things’ have conflicting requirements. In the tutorial, an example is given of scheduling events for a sports team, but you can imagine all sorts of variants: Train timetabling to improve services, assigning patients to surgeons to maximize the throughput of vital operations and minimize waiting lists, adjusting variable speed limits on motorways to reduce traffic jams during periods of congestion, etc etc.

Quantum computer tutorial quantum programming

This tutorial (above) describes how to find Maximum Common Subgraphs given two graphs. The example given in this tutorial is in molecule matching. Looking for areas where sub-structures in molecules are very similar can give us information about how such molecules behave. This is just one simple example of MCS. You can also imagine the same technique being applied to social networks to look for matches between the structuring of social groups. This technique could be used for improving ad placement or even for detecting crime rings.

These two tutorials are closely linked – as finding the MCS involves finding the MIS as part of the process. There are also lots of interesting applications of both these methods in graph and number theory.

If anyone would like to implement WMIS or MCS to solve any of the problem ideas mentioned in this post, please feel free!